Story: Kīngitanga – the Māori King movement

Mātene Te Whiwhi and Tāmihana Te Rauparaha

Mātene Te Whiwhi and Tāmihana Te Rauparaha

This 1846 drawing by Thomas Collinson shows the two principal founders of the Kīngitanga movement – Mātene Te Whiwhi (standing) and Tāmihana Te Rauparaha, together with Mātene's wife, Pipi (Phoebe) Te Ihurape and a child. Both men were baptised and taught to read and write by missionaries in Ōtaki, and they adopted European dress and manners. From 1853 they began campaigning for a Māori monarch to develop unity and retain Māori land. When war broke out in 1860 they opposed it and supported the government.

Using this item

Alexander Turnbull Library
Reference: A-292-033
Pencil work by Thomas Bernard Collinson

Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.

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How to cite this page:

Rahui Papa and Paul Meredith, 'Kīngitanga – the Māori King movement - Origins of the Kīngitanga', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/artwork/37853/matene-te-whiwhi-and-tamihana-te-rauparaha (accessed 11 December 2019)

Story by Rahui Papa and Paul Meredith, published 20 Jun 2012