Story: Conifer–broadleaf forests

Deforestation of New Zealand

Around 1000 AD, before humans arrived in New Zealand, forest covered more than 80% of the land. The only areas without tall forests were the upper slopes of high mountains and the driest regions of Central Otago. When Māori arrived, about 1250–1300 AD, they burnt large tracts of forest, mainly on the coasts and eastern sides of the two main islands. By the time European settlement began, around 1840, some 6.7 million hectares of forest had been destroyed and was replaced by short grassland, shrubland and fern land. Between 1840 and 2000, another 8 million hectares were cleared, mostly lowland or easily accessible conifer–broadleaf forest.

By 2000 New Zealand had only 6.2 million hectares of native forest. Most of it was on mountainous land and was dominated by southern beech.

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Te Ara - The Encyclopedia of New Zealand

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How to cite this page:

John Dawson, 'Conifer–broadleaf forests - Loss of conifer–broadleaf forests', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/interactive/11674/deforestation-of-new-zealand (accessed 20 September 2017)

Story by John Dawson, published 24 Sep 2007