Story: Netball

Page 8. New Zealand netball stars

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There have been many netball stars over the years. In 2012 some were particularly well known because of their contribution to the sport as players, coaches and administrators.

Lois Muir

Lois Muir has played a part in most of the significant changes in netball history. Born in Mataura, Southland, she became a formidable defender, and was chosen for the first New Zealand seven-a-side team in 1960. She was vice-captain of the national team at the first world championships in 1963, and later coached it for 15 years from 1974.

Instrumental in scoring the first sponsorship deals for the sport, Muir was later president of Netball New Zealand from 2007 until 2011. She was made a Dame Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2004.

Award winners

New Zealand netball has been repeatedly honoured in the annual Halberg Awards. The Silver Ferns were named the Team of the Year in 1987 and 2003, and New Zealand coaches Lois Muir, Lyn Gunson (formerly Parker) and Ruth Aitken have all received Coach of the Year awards. In 2003 Irene van Dyk was named New Zealand Sportswoman of the Year. The 2003 supreme Halberg Award went to the Silver Ferns for their world-championship-winning performance in Jamaica. In addition, Muir, Waimarama Taumaunu, Joan Harnett, Sandra Edge and Rita Fatialofa, and the 1967 and 1987 world-championship-winning teams, are inductees to the New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame.

Irene van Dyk

Irene van Dyk went from villain to hero in New Zealand netball history. In 1995 the tall young South African sharpshooter helped the Proteas (the South African national team) in an upset victory over the Silver Ferns, denying them a place in the world-championship final. In 2000 van Dyk immigrated to New Zealand and played her first international in the black and silver dress.

Van Dyk’s astonishing shooting skills – she occasionally shot with 100% accuracy in a match – took her to a world record of 200 test caps in 2011, including the 72 she played for South Africa. In 2009 she was appointed a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Ruth Aitken

A shooter in the New Zealand team at the 1979 world championships, Paeroa-born Ruth Aitken was appointed coach of the Silver Ferns in December 2001. Over the next decade, the Ferns scored 87 wins for a 78% success record, including the 2003 world title and two Commonwealth Games gold medals.

In 2011, the year she retired as coach, Aitken became an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit. She then took on a new role as Netball New Zealand Coaching Director.

Waimarama Taumaunu

Renowned for her indomitable style, Wai Taumaunu was a New Zealand representative from 1981. The astute defender played in the national side for 10 years, including three world championships, and was captain for three seasons. She was also a stalwart of Wellington netball.

Taumaunu became assistant coach to the Silver Ferns in 2008, and succeeded Ruth Aitken as head coach at the end of 2011. With Taumaunu at the helm, the Silver Ferns won the Constellation Cup for the first time in 2012. Away from the court, she has worked on government initiatives to boost sport, including developing coaching and Māori sport, and sitting on the governing board of SPARC (now Sport New Zealand).

Casey Williams

Regarded as one of the best defenders the netball world has seen, Casey Williams (now Kopua) was also lauded for her leadership skills. She was part of the New Zealand under-21 team that won the 2005 World Youth Championship, and won gold with the Silver Ferns at the 2006 and 2010 Commonwealth Games. She ended her career as a key member of the Silver Ferns team which won the world dup in 2019.

She was captain of the Silver Ferns from 2009 to 2014, and in 2011 she was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

How to cite this page:

Suzanne McFadden, 'Netball - New Zealand netball stars', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/netball/page-8 (accessed 8 December 2019)

Story by Suzanne McFadden, published 5 Sep 2013, updated 1 Aug 2015