Story: Whanganui region

Carving of Turi

Carving of Turi

The descendants of Turi, captain of the Aotea canoe, intermarried with the descendants of Rauru Kītahi, and became known as Ngā Rauru Kītahi. Turi is the top figure in this carving. In tradition, a great greenstone adze named Te Āwhiorangi was passed down to him from the god Tāne, who had used it to cut the sinews binding Ranginui (the sky) to Papatūānuku (the earth). In Turi’s time it was used to fashion the Aotea, which brought Turi and his people to New Zealand.

Using this item

Te Tumu Herenga Waka Marae, Victoria University of Wellington

All rights to images of this marae are held by Te Tumu Herenga Waka Marae, Victoria University of Wellington

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How to cite this page:

Diana Beaglehole, 'Whanganui region - Māori tradition', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/19016/carving-of-turi (accessed 7 July 2020)

Story by Diana Beaglehole, updated 1 Jun 2015