Story: Māori clothing and adornment – kākahu Māori

Maro – waist girdle

Maro – waist girdle

The maro, a frontal apron tied around the waist, was perhaps the most common and basic traditional Māori garment, and was worn by both men and women. This example of a woman's maro was given to Gilbert Mair (then a captain in the New Zealand militia) at Maungapōhatu, in the depths of the Urewera, in 1870. It is made from muka (flax fibre) with a tāniko border.

Using this item

Auckland War Memorial Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira
Reference: Ethnology number 820

Permission of the Auckland War Memorial Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira must be obtained before any re-use of this image.

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How to cite this page:

Awhina Tamarapa and Patricia Wallace, 'Māori clothing and adornment – kākahu Māori - Ngā taonga tuku iho – traditional Māori dress', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/40978/maro-waist-girdle (accessed 1 October 2020)

Story by Awhina Tamarapa and Patricia Wallace, published 5 Sep 2013