Kōrero: Animal welfare and rights

English anti-vivisection campaigns: rally against removal of the brown dog statue (2 o 2)

English anti-vivisection campaigns: rally against removal of the brown dog statue

The statue to the memory of the vivisected brown dog in Battersea, London, was a target for those who supported vivisection for medical research, and on several occasions it was attacked by rampaging students from University College and Middlesex Hospital. Opponents of the statue gained control of the local council, which decided to remove it. In response, over 3,000 anti-vivisectionists held a protest rally in central London in 1910. These events were reported in the New Zealand press. 

In 1985, over 70 years after the statue's removal, a new statue of the brown dog was commissioned by anti-vivisection groups and placed in Battersea Park.

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Me pēnei te tohu i te whārangi:

Nancy Swarbrick, 'Animal welfare and rights - Anti-vivisection and humanitarian movements', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/mi/photograph/41775/english-anti-vivisection-campaigns-rally-against-removal-of-the-brown-dog-statue (accessed 21 October 2019)

Story by Nancy Swarbrick, published 5 May 2011, reviewed & revised 1 Jul 2017